Quality Rating and Improvement Systems (QRIS)

A quality rating and improvement system provides a framework for building strong early care and education systems within states. With its increased focus on data collection, QRIS can be a powerful policy tool to transform early childhood education. 

A comprehensive QRIS: 
  • Makes program quality comparable across the field.
  • Creates and aligns program standards with early learning and practitioner standards.
  • Develops and aligns infrastructure to support quality improvement.
  • Assesses achievement along a continuum.

A quality rating and improvement system also provides families and government with clear data about where to invest early care and education dollars.  

QRIS National Learning Network

The BUILD Initiative's QRIS National Learning Network helps BUILD states and others develop and improve their QRIS. The network:

  • Provides direct technical assistance* to states for their planning and implementation efforts.
  • Brings state leaders, technical assistance providers, advocates and researchers together to share QRIS knowledge.
  • Publishes the latest QRIS research.
  • Hosts an ongoing webinar series on innovative QRIS practices.
  • Maintains a comprehensive sister website with QRIS information and resources.
  • Provides additional and targeted learning opportunities to state QRIS leaders.

All states considering a quality rating and improvement system, piloting one, or in full-scale implementation can visit the QRIS National Learning Network website. You will find information and a variety of resources that will help your state advocate for or plan and improve your QRIS, or contact the network staff.

*Technical assistance is available through grant funding and on a fee-for-service basis.


Shifting the Conversation: From Compliance to Continuous Quality Improvement, a BUILD blog post by Debi Mathias

You probably have visited an early childhood classroom that has "it" - that energy you feel when you walk in the door, a tangible feeling of excitement. Children are playing, laughing, testing out new ideas, problem solving, all engrossed in an inquiry approach to learning.

Look further. You'll find it's not just the children who are engaged, but their teachers and families. They are all part of a culture of learning - one that needs to exist in every early childhood setting, for every child and family, across all racial/ethnic, language, and economic boundaries.

Read more.